PLARIDEL POLICE STATION

PSUPT JULIO SAPIDA LIZARDO

Chief of Police

Contact Numbers 044-795-0057

Email Address: plaridelps@yahoo.com

 

HISTORY OF PLARIDEL POLICE STATION

           The social unrest created by five year of war which begun in 1896 had bred several uprisings of other acts of violence.

         Realizing the fact that military solution to the problem is unwired; the military authorities opted to recommend to the Second Philippine Commission headed   by William   Taft to take over. In accordance   with the  instructions of   the Secretary of War Elihu Root, the Commission took over the government from the military on July 1901 with Taft as Civil Governor.
                     
         With the advent of civilian rule in the Philippines, a question arose as to who should be responsible for maintaining law and order in the island. The existing local police forces were too small to cope up with the growing problems. Vice Governor Luke R. Wright, the concurrent Secretary of the Department of Commerce and police for the U.S. Army in the Philippines, who objected to toss the problem to the military, recommended to his fellow commissioners the immediate establishment of an organization to be charged with the task of maintaining peace and order in the localities already placed under civil rule. The proposal was welcomed by the Philippine Commission and in one of its first sessions, passed Organic Act No. 175, creating an insular police force. Titled "An Act Providing for the organization and government of an insular Constabulary and for the inspection of the municipal police", the legislation surprisingly called for an integrated approach and structure which was to be adopted by the Philippine government 75 years later.

PHILIPPINE COMMISSION IMPLEMENTS ORGANIC ACT 175

         On August 8, 1901, with the sanction of the U. S. War Department, Henry T. Alien, a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, a regular captain but then a lieutenant colonel of the cavalry, U.S. Volunteers in the Philippines officially designated and confirms by the Commission as Chief of Constabulary. With his designation as Chief of Philippine Constabulary was formally inaugurated and on some day buckled down to work.
                     
         Alien issued General Order No 1 appointing some 68 hand-picked officers, mostly from the U.S. Volunteers in accordance with Act No 175 with rank of first, second, third, fourth class inspectors, Constabulary ranks that were later to be replaced by military titles.
                     
         But while these hand-picked officers had the necessary military       preparations, they did not have any training and experience and police work. Worse, they had very little knowledge of the Filipino and his society. Hence, these     officers were given crash course to properly acquaint them with the laws and traditions of the country and the customs of the people. After their training, they were broken up into groups of four or five, composed of a captain and three or four lieutenants and were sent to the different parts of the country to recruit, organize and train the Filipinos.
                     
         The problem of effectively controlling a vast area from one central   headquarters decided to decentralize the same. So, on October 14, 1901, the PC Chief issued General Order No 49 grouping the pacified provinces into three (3) Constabulary districts.

         The first district included the provinces of Bataan, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Pangasinan, Tarlac and City of Manila where the district         headquarters was located. And Chief Baker was assigned as district inspector. The second district was composed of the provinces of Albay, Ambos,        Camarines (now Cam Nte and Cam Sur) Cavite, Masbate, Sorsogon and Tayabas (now Quezon), which then included the island of Marinduque and placed    under Maj Taylor, the district headquarters of which was set in Lucena, Tayabas. The third district comprised by the provinces of Antique, Bohol, Capiz, Iloilo, Leyte, Misamis (Mis Occ and Mis Or), Negros Occidental, Negros Oriental, Samar and Surigao. This district was under Capt. Goldsborough with headquarters in Iloilo.
                     
         Until the mid-1970s, when a major restructing of the nation’s police system was undertaken, the Philippines Constabulary (PC) alone was responsible for   law enforcement on a national level.   Independent city and municipal police forces took charge of maintaining peace and order on a local level, calling on the constabulary for aid when the need arose.  The National Police Commission (NAPOLCOM), established in 1966 to improve the professionalism and training of local police, had loose supervisory authority over the police.  It was widely accepted, however, that this system had several serious defects.  Most noteworthy were jurisdictional limitations, lack of uniformity and coordination, disputes between police forces, and partisan political involvement in police employment, appointments, assignments, and promotions.  Local political bosses routine used police as private armies, protecting their personal interests and intimidating political opponents.

In order to correct such deficiencies, the 1973 Constitution provided for the integration of public safety forces.  Several presidential decrees were subsequently issued, integrating the police, fire, and jail services in the nation’s more than 1,500 cities and municipalities.  On August 8, 1975, Presidential Decree 765 officially established the joint command structure of the Philippine Constabulary (PC) and Integrated National Police (INP) or PC/INP.  The constabulary, which had a well-developed nationwide command and staff structure, was given the task of organizing the integration.  The Chief of the Philippine Constabulary served jointly as the Director General of the Integrated National Police.  As Constabulary Commander, he reported through the military chain of command, and as head of the Integrated National Police, he reported directly to the Minister (later Secretary) of National Defense.  The National Police Commission was transferred to the Ministry (later Department) of National Defense, retaining its oversight responsibilities but turning over authority for training and other matters to the Philippine Constabulary and Integrated National Police.

POLICE INTEGRATION

         The Integrated National Police was assigned responsibility for public safety, protection of lives and property, enforcement of laws, and maintenance of peace and order throughout the nation.  To carry out these responsibilities, it was given powers ” to prevent crimes, effect the arrest of criminal offenders and provide for their detention and rehabilitation, prevent and control fires, investigate the commission of all crimes and offenses, bring the offenders to justice, and take all necessary steps to ensure public safety.”  In practice, the Philippine Constabulary retained responsibility for dealing with serious crimes or cases involving jurisdictions far separated from one another, and the Integrated National Police took charge of less serious crimes and local traffic, crime prevention, and public safety.

         The Integrated National Police’s organization paralleled that of the constabulary.  The thirteen (13) Philippine Constabulary Regional Command Headquarters were the nuclei for the Integrated National Police’s Regional Commands.  Likewise, the constabulary’s seventy-three (73) Provincial Commanders, in their capacity as Provincial Police Superintendents, had operational control of Integrated National Police forces in their respective provinces.  Provinces were further subdivided into 147 Police Districts, Stations and Sub-stations.  The constabulary was responsible for patrolling remote rural areas.  In Metro Manila’s four cities and thirteen municipalities, the Integrated National Police’s Metropolitan Police Force shared the headquarters of the constabulary’s Capital Command.
                     
         As of 1985, the Integrated National Police numbered some 60,000 people, a marked increase over the 1980 figure of 51,000.  Approximately 10 percent of the INP was composed of fire and prison officials, and the remainder was police.
                     
         Date as of June 1991. NOTE: The information regarding Philippines on this page is re-published from the Library of Congress Country Studies and the CIA World Fact Book.  No claims are made regarding the accuracy of Philippines Law Enforcement Information contained here.  All suggestions for corrections f any errors about Philippine Law Enforcement should be addressed to the Library of Congress and the CIA.

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PLARIDEL LOCAL POLICE FORCE UNDER THE PC/INP

         In the Province of Bulacan, the Plaridel Integrated National Police, at the time of its inception on August 8, 1975, was housed at the old Municipal Hall situated in Barangay Poblacion, Plaridel.  It was placed under the organizational and operational jurisdiction of the 170th PC Company which covered the 1st and 2nd Congressional Districts of Bulacan.  The INP station was initially composed of seven (7) police personnel, three (3) fire personnel and two (2) jail personnel.  The first INP Station Commander was Police Lieutenant Amado E Morales who served under the Hon. Mayor Jose P. Mariano (1934-1950).  PLt. Morales was succeeded by the following station commanders, to wit:

STATION COMMANDER

MAYOR(S) SERVED

TENURE OF MAYOR

LENGTH OF SERVICE OF STN CMDR

P/LT AMADO E. MORALES SR

Hon. Jose J. Mariano

1934-1950

1934-1950

P/CAPT JUSTO C. CRUS SR

Hon. Alfonso C. Reyes

1951-1971

1968-1972

P/CAPT ELIAS C. TUAZON

Hon. Amado M.   Buhain

1972-1986

1972-1976

P/LT BUENAVENTURA R. ESPIRITU

-do-

1976-1979

P/CAPT FERNANDO MENDEZ

-do-

1979-2 Months

P/MAJ GUILLERMO VALERIO

-do-

1980-1981

P/CAPT ARTURO A. PALILEO

-do-

1981-1984

1LT ROLANDO V. LORENZO, Philippine Constabulary

Atty. Felimon E. Mangahas (OIC)

May 6, 1986-Nov. 30, 1987

1984-1991

 

 

 

Hon. Agustin B. Coronel

Dec. 1, 1987-Feb. 1, 1988

Hon. Gerardo A. San Diego

Feb. 2, 1988-Jun 30, 1992

P/SINSP JESUS S. LAVA

-do-

1991-1993

Hon. Gerardito M. San Diego

June 30, 1992-1995

P/CINSP MOISES M. GUEVARRA

-do-

1993-1996

Hon. Norberto J. Oliveros

1995-1998

P/CINSP AGBAYANI CARATING

-do-

1996 (February)

P/SINSP ARTHUR FELIX E. ASIS

-do-

1996 (March)

P/CINSP FERDINAND YUZON

-do-

1996 (April-May)

P/CINSP CELEDONIO MORALES

-do-

June 1996-1998

PSUPT RAMON BIBIT

Hon. Jaime J. Vistan

1998-2002

1998-2000

P/CINSP RONALD     ESTILLES

-do-

2000-2001

P/CINSP ROMEO    PALISOC

-do-

2001

P/SINSP TOMAS SM. DE ARMAS

-do-

1999-2001

P/CINSP MARIO O. DELA VEGA

-do-

2001-2003

Hon. Rolando C. Javier

2002-2004

P/SUPT GEORGE    TORCUATOR

-do-

2003-2005

Hon. Anastacia “Tessie” R. Vistan

July 2004-present

P/SUPT ROBERT G. QUENERY

-do-

July 2004-Feb 14, 2005

P/SUPT SILVESTRE A. PRIMERO

-do-

Feb 15, 2005-March 14, 2005

P/SUPT ARTHUR FELIX E. ASIS

-do-

March 15, 2005-March 10, 2008

P/SUPT EDWIN A.    QUILATES

-do-

March 11, 2008-
Nov 25, 2009

P/SUPT CEASAR ZAFIRO L. TANNAGAN

-do-

Nov 29, 2009-
March 12, 2010

P/SUPT MANARANAY L. LOPEZ

-do-

March 12, 2010-
present

To correct the Integrated National Police’s image problem, dramatic changes were planned for the police in 1991.

         Hence, on July 23, 1990, pursuant to R. A. 6975, the newly-formed Philippine National Police (PNP) was to be a strictly civilian organization, removed from the armed forces and placed under a new civilian department known as the Department of the Interior and Local Government.
                     
         Local officials also played a role in law enforcement.  The justice system in the barangays empowered village leaders to handle petty and less serious crimes.  The intent of the program was to reinforce the authority of local officials and to reduce the workload on already overtaxed Philippine law enforcement agencies.

POLICE CHIEF INSPECTOR JESUS S. LAVA was the first Chief of Police of Plaridel Police Station under the new Philippine National Police organization.  The subsequent Chiefs of Police were the following:

CHIEF OF POLICE

LENGTH OF STAY

PSINSP JESUS A. LAVA

1991-1993

PCINSP MOISES M. GUEVARRA

1993-1996

PCINSP AGBAYANI CARATING

1996 (February)

PSINSP ARTHUR FELIX E. ASIS

1996 (March)

PCINSP FERDINAND YUZON

1996 (April-May)

PCINS CELEDONIO MORALES

June 1996-1998

PSUPT RAMON BIBIT

1998-2000

PCINSP RONALD ESTILLES

2000-2001

PCINSP ROMEO PALISOC

2001

PSINSP TOMAS SM. DE ARMAS

1999-2001

PCINSP MARIO O. DELA VEGA

2001-2003

PSUPT GEORGE TORCUATOR

2003-2005

PSUPT ROBERT G. QUENERY

July 4, 2004-Feb 14, 2005

PSUPT SILVESTRE A. PRIMERO

Feb 15, 2005-March 14, 2005

PSUPT ARTHUR FELIX E. ASIS

March 15, 2005-March 10, 2008

PSUPT EDWIN A. QUILATES

March 11, 2008-Nov 25, 2009

PSUPT CEASAR ZAFIRO L. TANNAGAN

Nov 25, 2009-March 12, 2010

PSUPT MANARANAY L. LOPEZ

March 12, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plaridel Police Station is presently located in Barangay Poblacion, Plaridel, Bulacan.  Its Chief of Police is PSUPT ALBERT E OCON. Plaridel Police Station is currently composed of three (5) police commissioned officers and thirty-three (33) non-commissioned officers and two (2) non-uniformed personnel.  The station has one (1) Community Public Assistance Center (COMPAC) center located along Cagayan Valley Road, Banga 1st, Plaridel, Bulacan and is manned by One (1) PNP personnel and Two (Traffic Enforcer) under PO3 Rolando Dizon Rovelo.

The present police to population ratio stands at 1: 2,828 based on the current population of 107, 491.